Motivate Yourself

Martin_Change

Motivate Yourself

Research, science and thousands of years of supervisors trying to get people to do things that they really don’t want to have taught us that it is really quite simple. People are motivated by either a carrot or a stick. Either they will do it because they want the rewards or they are afraid of the consequences.

The consequences of not doing something at work are often pretty evident. You will miss deadlines, maybe lose sales, and likely have your supervisor mad at you. These all strike at our basic fears which are actually based on our needs like the need for financial and emotional security or our unstated but very important need to belong and feel part of a group in society.

On the positive side the rewards are also evident. We get our material needs met through our compensation package and can continue to afford our food, clothing and shelter. We may also get our egos stroked when we do a good job which satisfies another hidden need, that we are recognized and acknowledged, particularly by our peers and superiors.

But haven’t you noticed that after a while at any particular task, function or job, all those basic motivators don’t really work anymore. You have your basic need met and you know you are good at your job and that your employer needs you. You are maxed out at the top of your pay levels and your employer can’t afford to raise your salary. You have used up or are tired of all the usual carrots and don’t fear the sticks anymore. What motivates you now?

Here are a few things that might get you back on the motivation train

Just Do it

Sometimes lack of motivation is actually inertia. You are just stuck like a car that is spinning its wheels and going nowhere. If you just relax and do the next thing that’s sitting right in front of you it may give you the boost that you need to get moving and motivated again.

Smile

If you are feeling unmotivated you probably look the part, anxious, grumpy or uncomfortable. Or all of the above. Change your look and your mood by trying to smile. It’s actually easier to smile than frown. It uses less muscles and energy and as a side benefit it’s contagious. At least you will be in a better mood.

Start Small

You don’t have to finish your doctoral thesis in order to get your mojo back. Unless you are a PhD candidate. If that is the case get back to the books. Pick something that you think you can do quickly and easily and finish it completely. Once you have a small success you will have the confidence for bigger projects.

Stick with the Winners

Some people at work are more positive and motivated than others. Spend your coffee break with these people instead of Donnie or Debbie Downer. You need a boost of energy from the outside and you are more likely to get it from a positive rather than a negative source.

Help Someone Else

One of the amazing things about motivation or positive energy is that whenever you give some of yours away you get back even more in return. It’s the law of karma or the universe but it works. So the next time you have completely lost your motivation, give someone else who really needs it a pep talk about the benefits of self-motivation. You will be pleasantly surprised when you feel better and more motivated yourself afterwards.

There are many other ways to self-motivate. When I am particularly low on myself and feeling completely unmotivated I remember this quote by Martin Luther King Jr. “Take the first step in faith. You don’t have to see the whole staircase, just take the first step.”

Mike Martin is a writer and the author of Change the Things You Can: Dealing with Difficult People.

You can  buy Change the Things You Can: Dealing with Difficult People from the publisher in print or e-book:

Booklocker

http://booklocker.com/books/5576.html

or from Amazon.com

CHANGE THE THINGS YOU CAN: Dealing with Difficult People

Also check out my fiction writing at

http://www.bodyonthet.com

http://www.walkeronthecape.com

http://www.beneaththesurface.co

Twitter @mike54martin

You can follow Sgt. Windflower on Facebook at

https://www.facebook.com/TheWalkerOnTheCapeReviewsAndMore?ref=hl

 

 

 

 

 

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Humour is Good For You… Especially at Work

Martin_Change

 

Some people think that you shouldn’t have fun at work, that this is a very serious business. Our advice to them: Lighten Up. There’s a reason why Google has a giant waterslide on its main campus or that tons of companies have ping pong tables, video games or free popcorn to eat while watching movies on the giant screen at work. That’s because the management at these well-respected firms have figured out that employees who work hard like to play hard too.

But besides being fun humour is actually good for you at work. Here are some good reasons why.

 1. Humour reduces Stress

Workplaces that encourage humour often also promote employee creativity and improve communications. This translates into improved employee wellness that helps reduce stress and burnout. An organization that encourages humour and shows that it doesn’t take itself too seriously ensures better employee relations and teamwork and it eliminates fear, one of the biggest stress-producers at work and within society.

2. Humour improves Productivity

Better cooperation between employees and teams almost automatically improves productivity but humour also creates the space for employees to challenge and change old habits and obsolete procedures. It can help create a culture where we laugh at our mistakes and learn from them rather than yelling at each other and it gives people the feeling of more control over their workplace. When they feel more comfortable and safe they work harder, faster and more productively.

3. Humour improves Physical Health

Humour improves our physical health by releasing toxins and stress just through the act of relaxation. Just as it impossible to speak and listen at the same time, it is also difficult to stay stressed out while you are laughing. Laughter also increases immune cells and improves your resistance to disease. And it triggers the release of endorphins which make you feel better and can even remove pain. Finally it has been shown that humour and laughter increases blood flow which prevents you against heart attacks and cardiovascular diseases.

4. Humour improves Mental Health

Not only can humour help your physical health but it can also do wonders for your mental and emotional well-being as well. Humour does that by dissipating negative or distressing emotions because you can’t feel two emotions at the same time. It’s hard to stay sad or continue being angry when someone or something makes you laugh. It also lets you shift your perspective so that you don’t feel as overwhelmed as you might be and gives you new energy to fight through or fight back.

5. Humour can Make you More Successful at Work

Many experts believe that humour is a key element to being successful at work. A Robert Half International study quoted in Forbes magazine found that 91% of executives believe a sense of humour is important for career advancement; while 84% feel that people with a good sense of humour do a better job. They also quote another study by the Bell Leadership Institute that found that the two most desirable traits in leaders were a strong work ethic and a good sense of humour. Let’s face it who would you like to be your boss? Someone who is strict and grumpy or someone who can see the humour in even your worst mistakes?

 6. Humour can Make you Easier to Work With

Even amongst your co-workers there’s no question that it’s easier to get along with someone with a sense of humour. That’s because using humour will often put the other person at ease and make them more comfortable to work alongside. It can break the tension in a stressful situation can even lead to creating better solutions and synergies in teams because it lets new ideas come in. Humour can also help by building trust between people in the workplace and there are even studies that show that people with a sense of humour tend to be both more likeable and are viewed as being more trustworthy by their peers.

Humour can be a valuable tool in your workplace arsenal but only if you practice and use it often. Your humour will have to be tasteful and non-discriminatory to be successful and be careful never to cross that invisible line that makes you a fool versus a funny gal or guy.

But if you want, you can forget about humour and having fun at work. You could be like the people in this quote by comedian Drew Carey. “Oh, you hate your job? Why didn’t you say so? There’s a support group for that. It’s called EVERYBODY, and they meet at the bar.”

Mike Martin is a writer and the author of Change the Things You Can: Dealing with Difficult People.

You can  buy Change the Things You Can: Dealing with Difficult People from the publisher in print or e-book:

Booklocker

http://booklocker.com/books/5576.html

or from Amazon.com

CHANGE THE THINGS YOU CAN: Dealing with Difficult People

Also check out my fiction writing at

http://www.bodyonthet.com

http://www.walkeronthecape.com

http://www.beneaththesurface.co

Twitter @mike54martin

You can follow Sgt. Windflower on Facebook at

https://www.facebook.com/TheWalkerOnTheCapeReviewsAndMore?ref=hl

 

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Dealing with a Difficult Boss

Martin_Change

 

Dealing with a Difficult Boss

We’ve all had a difficult boss or supervisor who until we found a way to deal with them, they drove us absolutely crazy. Or they left the situation/job/career/company.  Or we did. That’s the last resort but you may get there unless the situation improves.

The first step in dealing with a bad boss is to make a personal determination. How bad is this? Can I live with it? Is it likely to change in the short term? If your evaluation shows that it is having a strong or severe negative reaction on you, you have to do something. If you simply can’t put up with the boss’s behaviour or if you don’t think it will change anytime soon, you need to act.

You may have learned this lesson already but in case you haven’t, a bad situation never gets better on its own, especially at work. It only gets worse. So if you’ve had it with your particular bad boss here are five ways you can deal with them.

 1. Speak Up

It’s amazing how many people just sit there and tolerate bad and even offensive behaviour. The very first thing that you have to do with a bully or a bad boss is to speak up. Tell them in no uncertain terms what behaviour you find hurtful, degrading or just plain awful. Speak up and tell them that you do not like this behaviour and in as respectful a manner as you can muster, ask them to stop and to treat you with respect.

Then wait for their response, not just their oral response, but if they actually change their behaviour. That’s assuming that their first response is not to scream at you or even worse to threaten to fire you. If that’s the case then at least you know where you stand. But don’t be surprised if they go away, think about what you have said, and actually improve their behaviour a little. If not, proceed to step 2.

2. Reclaim your Boundaries

Even in this difficult job market you still have rights, no matter how much a bad boss or supervisor will try and tell you otherwise. You have the legal right to work in a safe and healthy workplace and if it is now you have a right to complain and ask that it be improved. You have the legal right not be sexually harassed or interfered with any way at your place of work and even if your company doesn’t have a policy on this, there are laws that will protect you.

But even more than your legal rights you have the right to be treated with respect and dignity and if you are not then you need to reclaim your boundaries in this regard. No one has the right to treat you disrespectfully but sometimes we let people, especially our bosses, think and act differently. Part of the onus is on you. Re-create your safety zone if someone has violated it and don’t let anybody cross over your personal red lines. If they are then move to Step 3.

3. Ask for Help

Sometimes we think that we have to solve problems, particularly workplace problems on our own. And that is true, sometimes. But then there are times when we’ve tried all that we know and the situation just doesn’t get any better. That’s when we have to remind ourselves again that it’s okay to ask for help. That help in dealing with a difficult boss can come from a variety of sources including moral support from our friends and co-workers. A problem shared is a problem halved.

But sharing isn’t enough to change the situation. For that you probably need to go over or around your boss. It could be possible to ask for help from your human resources section who sometimes can offer to mediate. But more than likely it means going to your boss’s supervisor. That is a difficult thing to do and it should only be attempted when you’ve tried and exhausted all other avenues. That person is likely aware of the bad boss situation already and may have some advice or suggestions to offer. If that route doesn’t work then you may have to go to Step 4.

4. Think about Leaving

This doesn’t mean threatening to quit, which you should never do unless you intend to carry that threat out. But if you can’t make the situation at work better then you need to take some time and think about leaving your current work arrangement. Even if it’s your dream job in your dream company it is even very good for you if you are having nightmares about it.

Weigh out the pros and cons of leaving and talk it over with your family and close friends. Then if you decide that the situation is intolerable for you, make a plan to leave your current job at some fixed point in the future. That could be six months or a year but just by setting a date you will take the pressure off. Don’t tell anybody, especially at work about your plan, but work towards it, including finding a safe landing place for you and your career. You can always change your mind in things get better, but if they don’t you can look after yourself.

 

Mike Martin is a writer and the author of Change the Things You Can: Dealing with Difficult People.

You can  buy Change the Things You Can: Dealing with Difficult People from the publisher in print or e-book:

Booklocker

http://booklocker.com/books/5576.html

or from Amazon.com

CHANGE THE THINGS YOU CAN: Dealing with Difficult People

Also check out my fiction writing at

http://www.bodyonthet.com

http://www.walkeronthecape.com

http://www.beneaththesurface.co

Twitter @mike54martin

You can follow Sgt. Windflower on Facebook at

https://www.facebook.com/TheWalkerOnTheCapeReviewsAndMore?ref=hl

 

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Resentments… I’ve Had a Few

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Letting Go of Resentments

Resenting someone or something else is not good for your mental or even physical health. Studies have shown that people who hang on to resentments suffer a high degree of stress that can lead to heart disease or stroke. When we harbor a resentment, especially against another person we trap ourselves in the past and will never be able to really move forward. The only thing to do with resentments is to let them go. Here’s how you can do it.

The problem with resentments is that long after the person who hurt you has forgotten all about their words or actions, you still remember and feel the pain inside. Part of you actually starts shutting down and you may become protective and less able to be a kind and loving person yourself. When you hold a resentment or grudge it’s not the other person who pays a price, it’s you.

Some people try and deal with resentments by trying to forget about it. That’s one strategy but it will only work if you are truly able to let it go. Most of us however just put in storage and come back to time and time again, only to feel that hurt over and over again. If we do not properly deal with a resentment it may start showing up as anger, even towards those who have never done anything to us. We may even feel that it was all our fault and this can produce shame, remorse and guilt. All negative emotions that can start affecting our own personality and character.

We do need to examine our actions that lead up to the resentment we feel. We may have played a minor role in how things worked out. If that is the case we need to acknowledge that behavior and forgive ourselves. But we just can’t sweep those words or actions under the rug, if we are to be free of the resentments we hold we have to commit to changing those parts of us that we don’t like and move on.

Then we have to deal with why the actions of another person have made us feel so badly. In some cases they may have acted without an apparent cause or reason. Those are the hardest resentments to deal with. They may even be nasty or hurtful people who lash out at others when they are feeling uncomfortable or disturbed. Try and figure out why they might have behaved in the way they did towards you. It may help you to understand why they acted so negatively towards you. If nothing else it will help you to decompress and understand your own feelings about them.

If you find their actions or behavior to be abusive or mean and this continues you have every right to limit your contact with this person. It may be difficult if it is a family member or co-worker but you do control your own personal time, especially as it relates to social activity. This may help but until you are finally able to let go of the resentment it will keep on hurting you.

Eventually you will have to find a way to let go of the resentment, not because you condone the behavior of the other person, but because it is hurting you. The only way to do this effectively is through forgiveness. You don’t have to say anything to the other person but you do have to reach inside of yourself and get to that forgiving place. You may never forget what the other person has done, but unless you forgive their actions you will continue to resent them. Give yourself the gift of forgiveness for it is a gift to you and not the other person. Then you can truly let go of the resentment and get on with the rest of your life.

 

Mike Martin is a writer and the author of Change the Things You Can: Dealing with Difficult People.

You can  buy Change the Things You Can: Dealing with Difficult People from the publisher in print or e-book:

Booklocker

http://booklocker.com/books/5576.html

or from Amazon.com

CHANGE THE THINGS YOU CAN: Dealing with Difficult People

Also check out my fiction writing at

http://www.bodyonthet.com

http://www.walkeronthecape.com

http://www.beneaththesurface.co

Twitter @mike54martin

You can follow Sgt. Windflower on Facebook at

https://www.facebook.com/TheWalkerOnTheCapeReviewsAndMore?ref=hl

 

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Dealing with Difficult People??? Ask Them Questions

Martin_Change

 

Dealing with Difficult People??? Ask Them Questions

Almost all men and lots of women don’t ask questions and yet assume that they know the answer. Duh!! Even if you’re afraid try asking questions directly of your difficult person. What’s the worst that can happen, they’re already intolerable?

Why don’t we ask questions when we don’t know something? That’s the real question. Some people like to pretend they are smarter than they really are and others somehow see it as a failure of some sort on their behalf. Asking questions is not an admission of failure. It is a statement of your intention to understand or be understood.

There is an old Chinese proverb that says “He who asks a question is a fool for five minutes; he who does not ask questions is a fool forever”. Which would you prefer? In addition to not being considered a fool most of us would prefer to be successful. Sometimes to be successful we have to ask for help.

Some people don’t ask questions of the difficult people in their life because they don’t want to hear the answer. Because knowing the truth about a situation may move them out of their comfort zone and might force them to take an action that they don’t know if they can handle. But if you want to know what’s really going on inside the head of the difficult person, why not just ask?

In the immortal words of one of my heroes, Kermit the Frog “Asking questions is a very good way to find out about something.” Try it you might like it.

Steps to asking good questions: As Kermit said the easiest way to learn about someone and their ideas is to ask them. But your difficult people are sometimes reluctant to talk about themselves.

To get them going here are a few basic steps to asking questions:

Create a safe environment

This may include the time and location of your little chat. Find a quiet place with no one else around and begin by noting that you have noticed some difficulties. Ask them for their version of events in a non-threatening and friendly manner. If they grow cold or hostile, back away until another time. If they are open then keep going. Be willing to share information about yourself to create a two way communication link. If necessary ask if it’s okay for you to ask a few questions. Try not to put them on the defensive with “why” questions right off the bat. They will tell you “why” if they feel comfortable enough.

Give them time to answer

One guideline is to give them up to ten seconds to answer a question before asking anything else. Remember that this is a test as to whether you can be trusted, not them. A short pause as they think about an answer is a good thing. At least you’ve got them thinking.

Listen carefully to their answers

Restate their answer in your own words to be sure you understand the reply. Avoid selective listening. That’s where you are filtering out or misunderstanding what is said. Some experts claim that we automatically eliminate from 70 to 90 percent of what is said to us. Paying attention is not only polite; it’s the best way to get what you need from your conversation partner. Participate mentally and physically in the dialogue using facial gestures, and body language and the occasional grunt or uh-huh to let them know that you’re still there. Smile. It just might be your best weapon for getting them to talk.

Build on what they say and ask follow up questions

If you are really paying attention you will notice that your difficult person is telling you a story, or at least their version of events. Think of yourself as a facilitator in a story telling contest and you want to know what comes next. So you ask them, and then what happened? If the story goes really well you might even ask them how they feel/felt about the story. But if they’re not ready for that yet, that’s okay. You’ve opened the door and it will never completely shut again.

Thank them for their time

When the conversation is over you should thank them for their time. It is not only good manners; it’s a signal to them that you respect them. It’s also a good way to end whatever type of conversation you’ve just had, on equal terms. No matter how grumpy, crusty, or pig-headed they are you will know a little more about what makes them tick, and what makes them explode. They will also know a little more about you and maybe realize that you are not their problem after all.

Mike Martin is a writer and the author of Change the Things You Can: Dealing with Difficult People.

You can  buy Change the Things You Can: Dealing with Difficult People from the publisher in print or e-book:

Booklocker

http://booklocker.com/books/5576.html

or from Amazon.com

CHANGE THE THINGS YOU CAN: Dealing with Difficult People

Also check out my fiction writing at

http://www.bodyonthet.com

http://www.walkeronthecape.com

http://www.beneaththesurface.co

Twitter @mike54martin

You can follow Sgt. Windflower on Facebook at

https://www.facebook.com/TheWalkerOnTheCapeReviewsAndMore?ref=hl

 

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Are You a Difficult Person: Part 2

Martin_Change

Are You a Difficult Person?

Dealing with difficult people is always an interesting workshop topic and many books (including one by me) have been written on the subject but what I have discovered is that before I could deal with the difficult people in my life I had to look in the mirror and ask a very important question. Am I a difficult person? So to help you (and all the people around you) here is Part 2 of the Ten Signs of a Difficult Person. (The link to Part 1 is below)

Ten Signs of a Difficult Person

Part 2

 

6. You can’t seem to control your emotions at work

Whatever is going on in your personal life will affect your work life. That is absolutely true, all of the time. There are however invisible lines that you should never cross at work, most of them relating to your emotional behavior or how you let your personal side and/or problems out into the workplace. Everyone will understand a period of grief or loss. Everybody, except the old and grizzled, will appreciate new love. Almost all will get the fact that a sick partner or a new baby will bring sleepless nights and increased irritability. It’s when these emotions are manifested in a way that is inappropriate and involves other workers who chose not to be involved, that it becomes a problem. You are a difficult person if you cross those invisible, but very real lines at work.

 

  1. You can get angry very easily

There are incidents and events in our lives that legitimately arouse our ire and anger. When they happen we feel a rush of adrenaline that produces the “fight or flee” instinct. A normal person will judge the most appropriate response given the extent of the situation and act accordingly. Sooner rather than later the anger will subside a little, at least enough to allow us to continue on with our lives.

A difficult person only has one response to such situations. They get angry very quickly regardless of the situation and they hang on to that anger for days and days. They try and hold it in but at some point their anger, that by now has been turned into resentments, explodes. If that has happened to you more than a few times then you meet the basic qualifications of a difficult person.

8. You over-drink or abuse substances, legal or otherwise

This is the classic “chicken and egg” question. Do you over-drink or use other substances because you have difficult situations in your life or do you become a difficult person because you use and/or abuse substances? The answer is that it doesn’t matter. Abuse or addiction is an unhealthy way to cope with life and the others around you almost certainly will think you are a difficult person. That is the nature of the disease of addiction and abuse, even if you don’t recognize it.

There is lots of help available to help you deal with this issue and you will be wise to seek that out and take advantage of it. Those around you, especially at work, will be eternally grateful if you do.

 

  1. You are paranoid and think “they” are out to get you

It is not easy to self-diagnose paranoia, since it is an ailment that you have created with your own imagination. But if you find that you are spending more time thinking about what “they” are going to do, versus what they actually are doing, then you are at least a little paranoid.

Paranoia is another form of fear and it can paralyze you if you let it run free. It does not necessarily make you a difficult person unless you apply your paranoia filter to everything that people say or do around you. Even worse is to act on your paranoia by building walls, real or imagined, around you. If you find that you are you doing that you are probably a difficult person.

 

  1. People tell you that you are “difficult” to work with

 

Most people don’t lie and if you ask them the straight up question, “Am I a difficult person?” and they say yes, maybe, or sometimes, then at least part of the time you are a difficult person. If someone volunteers this information, especially a close friend or colleague, then you can be pretty sure that as much as you may be trying not to, some of your difficult personality is leaking out. The good news is that you have friends who care enough about you to want to make suggestions to become an even better person. Thank them for their honesty, and keep reading this book. Just substitute I for them every time you see an identification of a problem and see the solution inside of yourself.

 

Here is the link to Part 1

https://changethethingsyoucan.wordpress.com/2015/01/21/are-you-a-difficult-person-part-1-2/

 

Mike Martin is a writer and the author of Change the Things You Can: Dealing with Difficult People.

You can  buy Change the Things You Can: Dealing with Difficult People from the publisher in print or e-book:

Booklocker

http://booklocker.com/books/5576.html

or from Amazon.com

CHANGE THE THINGS YOU CAN: Dealing with Difficult People

Also check out my fiction writing at

http://www.bodyonthet.com

http://www.walkeronthecape.com

http://www.beneaththesurface.co

Twitter @mike54martin

You can follow Sgt. Windflower on Facebook at

https://www.facebook.com/TheWalkerOnTheCapeReviewsAndMore?ref=hl

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Are You a Difficult Person: Part 1

Martin_Change

 

Are You a Difficult Person?

Dealing with difficult people is always an interesting workshop topic and many books (including one by me) have been written on the subject but what I have discovered is that before I could deal with the difficult people in my life I had to look in the mirror and ask a very important question. Am I a difficult person? So to help you (and all the people around you) here is Part I of the Ten Signs of a Difficult Person.

Ten Signs of a Difficult Person

Part I

  1. You have few friends at work

It may be that everyone else is a snob or you may be new at your job. Give it a little time and see what happens. Be a nice, helpful person and do your job well and most people who are not difficult will respond in kind. If you still have few friends after a year or so even after your best efforts then you should consider leaving. It may not be the right fit for you. If you find that you make friends at work and then lose them fairly regularly, it’s all about you. You are a probably a difficult person to get along with.

 

  1. You have serious low self-esteem at work

Some of us are born this way but most of us get low self-esteem from messages that we have been given as a child, usually from our parents. As adults we often have to work very hard to stay positive about ourselves. If you find that your self-esteem is low, or getting lower at your place of employment, it may be that you have someone triggering those feelings in you. If that is the case you have to find a way to deal with it in a positive manner or move on. If you are a difficult person you will not be able to process this input and may find that your self-worth is even decreasing. Your response may be to either further withdraw or lash back. Either way, you are being a difficult person.

  1. You feel shunned or ignored at work

If you feel shunned or ignored at work then it is either your feeling or it is real. If you think it is just a feeling, then ask one of your co-workers. An honest person will tell you that it’s your perfume or lack of deodorant. If you do not change then you are a difficult person. If you are really being shunned at work then you need to figure out why. If it is because you are just a superior wit and intellect you may want to dummy down for a while. If it is because you can’t keep a secret or blame other people for your mistakes then you are probably a difficult person. To not change these behaviors makes you a truly difficult person.

  1. You feel people pull back when you come close

Once again, review your personal hygiene. If that’s not it, then you may need to ask someone why it appears that they or others are pulling back from you. Be prepared for an answer you may not like and try not to react. They may tell you that they are afraid of your reaction to things, that you are too negative, or that you are always complaining. If you react you lose all of the points you have accumulated to date and have to admit you are a difficult person. If having heard the truth from the lips of your co-worker you choose to ignore it, you move up into the officer class of difficult people.

  1. Your boss tells you that you need help

Your boss may be a very difficult person to work with. He or she may be a controlling bully or just a mean old dog. But if they ever tell you “I think you need help”, that is one surefire way to know that you are a difficult person. By the time you reach this point you would have had plenty of opportunities to screw up and just as many opportunities to change. You have chosen to continue and to have your boss name it is just the icing on a well-baked cake. You have formally arrived as a difficult person.

 

Mike Martin is a writer and the author of Change the Things You Can: Dealing with Difficult People.

You can  buy Change the Things You Can: Dealing with Difficult People from the publisher in print or e-book:

Booklocker

http://booklocker.com/books/5576.html

or from Amazon.com

CHANGE THE THINGS YOU CAN: Dealing with Difficult People

Also check out my fiction writing at

http://www.bodyonthet.com

http://www.walkeronthecape.com

http://www.beneaththesurface.co

Twitter @mike54martin

You can follow Sgt. Windflower on Facebook at

https://www.facebook.com/TheWalkerOnTheCapeReviewsAndMore?ref=hl

 

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